Emancipation Revisited

July 31st, 2017

Emancipation is a difficult word. It’s too long, for a start: five syllables long. When combined with the four syllables of Independence holiday it becomes that horrible portmanteau word someone invented (a Government official, perhaps?) a few years ago… Emancipendence. But I would suggest we could hardly celebrate them both together, in one breath. That would be trivialising the […]

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Tackling Climate Change on Several Fronts

March 1st, 2017

Despite what the new President of the United States says, climate change is real. It is with us, here and now. I believe developing countries such as ours have fully acknowledged this fact (as well as ninety-something per cent of scientists). After all, we are already feeling the effects. Jamaicans may not look at regular […]

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There Are Many Ways to Be an Activist

February 11th, 2017

Activism (and advocacy, its first cousin) is like a tree with several large branches. Like our guango tree. Each branch grows in a different direction, but each branch is strong. Or, to use another nature metaphor, it is like a plant bearing many seeds. Like our moringa tree. The seed pods fall, and break. Sometimes […]

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The Populist Or The Pragmatist: Which Do You Prefer?

January 15th, 2017

I have been thinking about the nature of leadership, recently. A few things have turned my thoughts in this direction: Donald J. Trump will be inaugurated as President of the United States of America in a few days’ time – a man who has been described by his predecessor (and more recently, by John Lewis, […]

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On Sticking One’s Neck Out (A Message for Youth Month)

November 22nd, 2016

I recently attended the launch of the Economic Growth Council’s (EGC) Call to Action (with the hashtag #5in4 – 5% growth in 4 years, in other words). It was a glitzy affair, complete with disco lights and plush armchairs, and I wrote more about it on my blog. The Chair of the EGC Michael Lee-Chin, […]

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A Question of Respect

January 14th, 2016

Mr. Christopher Gayle, a highly esteemed Jamaican cricketer, embarrassed a woman reporter recently. As such, I feel he disrespected her. I have often thought about the word “respect,” a frequently used term in Jamaica. Many Jamaicans simply say “Respect,” in response to a comment, or in concluding a conversation. It’s a kind of acknowledgement of […]

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